Pizza with garlic scape pesto, vegan bacon and asparagus

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We’re in a heat wave here in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) – it has been a long one with daytime temperatures around 30 degrees but with the humidity factored in, it feels like 40. But I had a handful of garlic scapes from the farm and they have a very short season. So I cranked up my oven and made pizza. This is my second batch of scape pesto this week – it is my favourite way to eat these vegetables.

Scapes are the flower growing out of hard necked varieties of garlic – we cut them back to get bigger garlic bulbs. They’re long and curly and have a mild garlic flavour that is delicious in pesto, grilled, in stir fries or anywhere you’d put asparagus or green beans.

The kids won’t touch them – they think they have a strong flavour – and they do have a unique flavour. They pick them out every time – even if I disguise them with green beans! So this pesto is just for the grown-ups. The kids have their own pizza with tomato sauce on it and Daiya cheese. It’s easy enough to split the dough in half and make them the kind of pizza they like.

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For this recipe, feel free to adjust to your taste. Once you have the general concept, you can’t go wrong playing with the ingredients.

Scape pesto

  • a few scapes (6 or so)
  • 1/4 cup of pine nuts
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • fresh basil (to taste – I like 1/2 cup if I can harvest it)
  • 1 tsp salt

Put all the ingredients in a food processor and blend until finely chopped. Spread on pizza or mix with hot, freshly cooked pasta (try gnocchi).

I’ve paired my pesto with a cashew cheese, vegan bacon and asparagus. My daughter ended up loving this pizza with the pesto and cashew cheese!

Vegan grill: tons of veggies and burgers

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Asparagus season is my favourite time of the year. After a long winter of eating potatoes, carrots and other veggies that store well over the winter, the first really fresh vegetable that I can harvest from my garden is asparagus. By Spring, I am craving greens – the ones in the grocery store are tired and tasteless. And then these little sprouts break through the ground.

This winter was a long one. Which made the beginning of asparagus season extra sweet.

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And we love asparagus just about any way you can cook it. But my favourite way to eat asparagus is on the grill. And that brings up the question – grill?

What do vegans grill?

We put just about any vegetable on the grill either in packets or brushed with oil directly on the grill. The ones we brush with oil are: asparagus, peppers, zucchini, onions, scapes and mushrooms. The ones I brush with oil and seasoning are: potatoes, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, snow peas and carrots. And then there’s the veggie burgers, tofu, vegan sausages and vegan hot dogs. We’ve done corn on the cob on the grill too!

Since my eldest was old enough to eat solid foods she has been a big fan of barbecued vegetables. Sometimes we’ll toss the grilled vegetables in olive oil and mix them into cooked whole wheat pasta. Veggies that won’t usually get touched will get gobbled down if they’ve been grilled.

The burger above is one my son made himself – burger with vegan cheese, zucchini, pepper and asparagus. Topped with ketchup and it’s a delicious mess – everything falls off and the bun can’t contain its contents. And that’s my picky eater! Mine is topped with mushrooms, grilled onions and whatever else the kids have left me.

More ideas for asparagus

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If you have more asparagus than you know what to do with (this has never happened to me but I guess it’s possible), fry it in olive oil with garlic, add marinated tofu, fresh herbs and pasta. I like to top my pasta with a salty mix of nutritional yeast, hemp seeds, a splash of olive oil to make it all stick together and salt.

Easy tofu marinade:

  • 1 crushed clove of garlic
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar (or other nice vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil

Add cubed tofu to the marinade. Toss and let it sit for about 15 minutes in the marinade before frying it with veggies or you can bake it at 350 for 20 minutes stirring once.

Asparagus for breakfast

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If you still have leftover asparagus, toss it in your scrambled tofu.

The only thing you have to keep in mind with asparagus is not to overcook it. And don’t boil it.

Enjoy it while it lasts!

Veg-enriched tomato sauce with pasta

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It’s Spring in Canada and I’ve started picking from my garden. Mostly I’m getting asparagus but I’ve also got fresh herbs. I’ll do a post about asparagus soon but tonight I managed to sneak a new vegetable into my picky eater – and that’s always worth sharing!

Tomato sauce isn’t always a hit with my son. He doesn’t like it chunky or with too many herbs. He doesn’t like to see the onions but if they’re chopped small and we’re at a restaurant, he may just ignore them. That’s a huge step for him but he might be doing it just to get more white bread or gelato after his dinner. I still consider it a win.

At home, I usually chop the vegetables that he doesn’t like in big pieces so it’s easy for him to find them and pick them out. There have been times when an onion accidentally made it into his mouth and he wouldn’t eat any more dinner as a result. So I know with my family it is not a good idea to hide vegetables.

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Until tonight. I was making a tomato sauce and we had some nice mushrooms, peppers and the canned tomatoes were diced. I knew I’d have to puree them to make a sauce my son would eat so I decided to puree the whole lot together.

I will often puree red peppers in the tomato sauce – it makes for a really great, sweet sauce that the kids love. If you have picky kids, give it a try. Sweet peppers are a great source of Vitamin C and other nutrients and they make an excellent addition to a tomato sauce.

For this sauce, I fried up garlic in olive oil, added chopped red pepper and mushrooms. After a few minutes, I added the can of chopped tomatoes and pureed the mix. Then I let it simmer. I added a few sprigs of fresh rosemary from the garden for flavour.

I had a few asparagus from the garden so I chopped them small and added them to the sauce as it simmered. I didn’t want to puree them since we love asparagus. And that’s it. It made for a delicious sauce and I managed to get my son to eat mushrooms happily for the first time!

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The sauce is served on whole wheat pasta with chopped basil (from the garden) and a mix of hemp seeds, nutritional yeast and salt for a savoury topping. And as you can see, it was served with store-bought bread because I can’t always bake my own bread.

The protein question

I’ve recently been asked about protein. How do I get my protein if I don’t eat animals? Well, it’s not really something I worry about since I eat a good variety of whole foods. Protein is made up of amino acids. Whole proteins are made of all the amino acids our body’s can’t make themselves – essential amino acids. These are found in animal meat. But our bodies have to break them down to use them anyway so there is no advantage to getting our essential amino acids all together.

Vegetables are also full of amino acids but they don’t have them in same combination that we need. But as long as you’re eating a variety – and in this meal we have mushrooms, peppers, whole wheat, hemp seeds and other plant-based sources of amino acids – we’re getting everything we need.

And as I said above, since our bodies need to break them down anyway, there’s really no difference between getting them all in one place or getting them in a variety of places. If you’re getting your protein from a variety of vegetable sources, you’re also getting all the vitamins and minerals your body needs too.

So there you go – as long as you’re indulging in a variety of plant-based foods, you’ll get the protein you need.

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We finished this meal with homemade ice cream made from coconut milk and cashew cream. And that was another great source of protein. The vegan chocolate chips and marshmallows – those were just treats. The bananas just happen to be healthy treats.

Oatmeal cakes with berries

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It’s Victoria Day here in Canada so I thought I’d make something special for breakfast. My kids would be disappointed if I made anything but pancakes but I wanted something different. These pancakes are made with oats.

They are as hearty as you’d expect from a bowl of oatmeal and more nutritious than your average pancake. Topped with berries, they were delicious and the kids were so happy to see I had made pancakes for breakfast!

 

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The recipe comes from Thug Kitchen. It’s quite simple: let the oats soak up almond milk for a few minutes before adding the rest of the dry ingredients and fry them up like pancakes. Next time, I’ll make a double batch – they disappeared too quickly with a family of four.

The berry sauce is simply simmered berries in a bit of sugar, fresh lemon juice, splash of water and vanilla extract. Thug Kitchen calls for blueberries but I had this frozen berry mix with cherries, blackberries and blueberries that the kids love. They’re full of antioxidants and flavour.

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For those of you who are here in Canada, have a great long weekend! We’ll be heading out for a nice, long bike ride as a family with peanut butter and jam sandwiches for lunch along the way. I hope you’re making memories too!

Deconstructed burritos

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I was at the grocery store with my son yesterday and I asked him which vegetables we should buy. Brussels sprouts, zucchini, cauliflower, broccoli? I asked. He chose all of them. Plus asparagus, cherry tomatoes, peppers and avocado. It wasn’t along ago that he didn’t eat much aside from cucumber but I’m glad to report he’s broadened his taste.

So how did I get my picky eater to eat more than just cucumbers and white rice? Obviously there were many factors and it helped to have a big sister who loves vegetables. But there are two things that I credit the most with his transformation to a little rabbit.

My vegetable garden

I have a vegetable garden. And the kids help me choose what to plant and they’re welcome to eat anything from the garden at any time (as long as I get the first ripe tomato). There was a year that (thanks to my daughter) we planted purple varieties of everything: peas, broccoli, carrots, beans. And that was the year my son decided he would only eat orange carrots. I guess a guy’s got to draw the line somewhere! So the next year I bought orange carrot seeds and planted more traditional varieties of vegetables. Goodbye lemon cucumbers!

My kids get really excited about the veggies growing in the garden. They graze on whatever they find. They eat pea shoots, berries, and they love parsley stems. One year I thought I had a regular rabbit visitor but it turned out my daughter thought the carrot tops were parsley.

I try to get them to help in the garden as much as I can but if all they’re doing is eating from the garden, that’s great too. And when we pull a nice orange carrot from the ground, it’s something everyone is excited about. I think being involved and eating from the garden has made my son appreciate fresh vegetables.

Setting a good example

The other thing that I think we’ve done to encourage him to eat a bigger variety of vegetables is to eat them ourselves. The three of us love all kinds of vegetables and we eat them all the time. When my son turned his nose up at most vegetables, we always made sure we had his favourite vegetables at every meal but we also fit in the zucchini, beets and squash. We enjoy them – and he sees us enjoy them. And I think if he tries them a few times, he warms up to them.

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You’ll notice a few ingredients in my bowl that I don’t put in his. Onions, mushrooms, salsa, cashew cream and even orange vegan cheese are on his list of things he won’t touch at the moment. But that list is shrinking every day and I’m proud of him for following our example and being adventurous at the dinner table.

Quick veggie, chickpea and tofu bowl

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Here’s another quick weeknight meal. It’s one I reach for when I’m really short on time. Chopped raw veggies with beans over couscous takes only minutes to prepare and it’s a reliable kid-pleaser.

Today, I cubed tofu, covered it in olive oil, a splash of apple cider vinegar, garlic clove and oregano and put it under the broiler while I prepared the rest of the food. I added chopped broccoli under the broiler for the last five minutes and it was delicious.

For the grownups, I made a tahini-miso sauce. A couple tablespoons of tahini mixed with a tablespoon of each olive oil, miso and water to thin it.

Rinse the canned chickpeas under hot watch to get rid of some of the sodium from the can and warm them up. The couscous is ready about 5 minutes after the water boils – my kids like the rainbow couscous.

The best part – altogether, it takes about 15 minutes to prepare. What’s your easiest home-cooked weeknight dinner?

Tofu Florentine with home fries

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We don’t have a lot of Easter traditions because we don’t eat eggs (or decorate with them) and we’re not religious. Rather, we use this weekend to celebrate the coming of Spring. It’s not always here on Easter weekend but early signs are everywhere. The snow is gone and the robins are back with their trilling birdsongs. When the sun comes out, it’s really nice to be outside. I even put my super warm winter coat away – though our light winter coats are still needed.

This morning, the kids played together nicely enough for me to sleep in. And when I got up, I craved this breakfast that I used to make often before the kids were born. It’s one or two steps too many for most weekend breakfasts (and the kids are often begging for pancakes or oatmeal) but with the extra sleep I got last night, I thought I’d make one of my favourite breakfasts.

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If you start the potatoes first, it isn’t time-consuming to make. Start by boiling the potatoes. While the tofu is broiling, fry an onion until golden, add the potatoes and whatever spices you like. Steam the spinach and make the hollandaise sauce. There are a lot of really nice vegan hollandaise sauces but this one is so simple that it’s always been my go to. Sometimes, simplicity just wins.

Hollandaise sauce

  • 2/3 cup vegan mayo
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • ┬ápinch cayenne
  • pinch turmeric
  • salt

Combine the ingredients. Done.

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Because I was generous with the cayenne, I topped my daughter’s breakfast with plain mayo (which I know she likes) and a sprinkling of paprika. My son won’t eat spinach or mayo so his english muffin is buttered and topped with tofu with the potatoes on the side. He’ll eat his veggies at another meal.

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Some day he’ll look at our meals and realize he’s missing out when he skips the veggies and sauce but we’re not there yet. That’s okay – we’ve got time. The truth is, we’re making progress and every month he becomes less strict about the foods he eats. Last month, he happily ate parsley and halved cherry tomatoes for the first time instead of just whole cherry tomatoes. I think this summer, we’ll win him over to regular-sized tomatoes. Fingers-crossed!

Happy Easter everyone! How do you celebrate?