Easiest healthy breakfast for the kids

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When I started commuting for work a few days a week, which means I leave the house before my stomach is ready to handle anything solid, I started bringing overnight oats for me to eat when I’m settled at the office. They take me less than five minutes of prep time the night before and they’re ready to eat without a fuss.

Best of all, I can change it up a million different ways – soy, almond, coconut, cashew milk, any frozen or dried fruit I have on hand – there’s no end to the varieties I can make. As someone who gets bored eating the same foods over and over again, this is something that always satisfies. Even if I have absolutely no fruit in the house, I can always add a spoonful of homemade jam. This is a lazy but delicious meal.

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I enjoy it and I’ve found even the kids love it. In fact, if I make them overnight oats, breakfast always goes smoothly even if they’re overtired and grumpy.

This week, I’m going away on business for a few days so I made a few jars to keep in the fridge to make mornings easier on my husband. If you haven’t tried this breakfast, do yourself a favour and give it a try. Use your favourite vegan milk to make the easiest, healthiest and most delicious breakfast your can throw together in five minutes.

Overnight oats

  • jars with lids
  • oatmeal
  • seeds (I use chia and hemp)
  • cinnamon
  • fruit (I used peaches and blackberries)
  • brown sugar
  • vegan milk

Fill the jars 3/4 full of oatmeal. Add a teaspoon of seeds, as desired, cinnamon, brown sugar and top with fruit. If you’re in a real rush, just use oatmeal and a spoonful of jam. Fill the jar to the top with vegan milk. Put the lid on and give it a shake so all the seeds get mixed in.

Get a few extra minutes of sleep in the morning because breakfast is done!

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Simple, delicious vegan pancakes

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On Friday, when I brought my sleepy son to the kitchen for breakfast and sat him at the table and asked him what he’d like to eat – peanut butter and jam on toast or cereal being the options – he said, “pancakes. We haven’t had pancakes in forever and I love pancakes.” I told him we couldn’t make pancakes on weekdays but the weekend was coming.

And then yesterday, when I was baking a double batch of muffins to freeze for school lunches, he excitedly came running down the stairs. “I smell pancakes!” Poor guy, I had completely forgotten. It’s a good thing he likes muffins!

So this morning, the first thing I did was make a double batch of pancakes. This batch will last a few breakfasts popped into the toaster and nibbled as a snack.

If you’re new to vegan baking, you may wonder how the pancakes are made without egg or milk and if they turn out well. We have numerous recipes for pancakes, plain, banana flapjacks, pumpkin and anything else you can imagine and they’re all delicious.

Here’s a simple recipe you can use and adapt as you wish. Top it with fresh fruit, a berry sauce but most importantly, pure maple syrup. This recipe is based on Perfect Pancakes in Vegan Brunch by Isa Chandra Moskowitz – it’s a great book for breakfast-lovers.

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Vegan pancakes

  • 1 1/4 cup of flour (I use half whole-wheat)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons neutral oil (like grape seed oil)
  • 1 1/3 cup vegan milk
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Heat and oil a well-seasoned griddle. Make sure it’s hot.

Combine dry ingredients and wet ingredients in separate bowls. Add the wet to the dry and mix until there are only small lumps.

Pour batter onto the griddle – once bubbles are forming, flip. Serve warm with maple syrup.

I always make double batches because you can never have too many (and one batch doesn’t fill four people up). Reheat pancakes by popping them in the toaster.

Vegan camping

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This summer, we took a road trip to the East Coast of Canada. We brought a tent and reserved campsites at National and Provincial Parks from New Brunswick to Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. We made memories that will last a lifetime.

We’re seasoned campers – we love sleeping in a tent and hearing the sounds of the forest around us. We love waking up with the sun and the chirping birds. I love cooking over a fire pit – potatoes in the coals, veggie burgers flame broiled – everything just tastes better when we’re camping.

This summer, though, everything was different. When we arrived in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, there was a fire ban. We have a simple isobutane camping stove for making coffee but we didn’t have much fuel. We couldn’t light a fire in the fire pits provided. We ran out of fuel after making a pot of coffee and we were stuck.

Aside from our usual stock of fruits and vegetables, we had a cooler stocked with veggie burgers, vegan sausages, veggie dogs and tofu without a way to cook any of it. None of the stores we stopped at carried isobutane so we had to eat at restaurants for the first few days on the island (more about that later).

Eventually, we stumbled on the only store in Cape Breton that carries our fuel and we happily bought a couple canisters and a frying pan. Now we had a way to cook our traditional camping food.

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Snacking on dry cereal and reading a book on our campsite.

With so many choices for vegan burgers, hot dogs and sausages, you can easily blend in with the other campers. But when you run out of that and you’re in a fisherman’s paradise without another vegan around, it’s time to get creative.

With our minimal camping stove, a pot for boiling water and a frying pan, we found a few things in the rural grocery stores to feed our hungry mob. Our favourite by far was a noodle stir fry.

Note: We don’t usually buy instant anything but when you’re camping and using fuel that is as hard to find as these canisters were, you do what you must to conserve the fuel.

Vegan noodle stir fry

  • one package of instant noodles
  • oil (sesame, canola, grape seed – whatever)
  • one block of tofu
  • seasoning (Herbamare is great but use what you can find and what you like)
  • one package of broccoli slaw (or another packaged salad with broccoli, brussels sprouts and kale)
  • soy sauce packets (if you have them)

Cook the noodles according to the package. Drain and put aside.

Chop the tofu into cubes and fry it in the oil with the seasoning. When browned, add the slaw and cook until wilted. Add the cooked noodles and stir to mix. Add the soy sauce and mix again.

That’s about the easiest vegan meal you can source in an isolated town. Another idea we enjoyed – minute rice and beans.

Camping rice and beans

  • minute rice
  • can of beans (black or red kidney are great)
  • canned corn (normally I’d eat frozen but we were pleasantly surprised)
  • seasoning

Cook the rice according to the directions on the box. When it’s done, add the drained and rinsed beans and the drained canned corn. Season to taste and enjoy!

Breakfast

When we’re car camping, I put quick cooking oatmeal in little mason jars with raisins or cranberries, sugar, cinnamon and I leave some space for hot water. (You could use instant oatmeal but I prefer the texture of the quick cooking oatmeal – less mushy.) The jars should be 3/4 full.

Hot oatmeal to go
Pack your oatmeal in jars to reduce waste.

When you’re ready to eat, pour boiling water in the jars, screw the tops closed, shake them up a bit and let them sit for a few minutes to allow the hot water to cook the oatmeal. My kids love having their own individual jars.

If you’re pressed for space, fill a ziplock bag with oatmeal, sugar, dried fruit and spices. Maybe include seeds – we’re eating a lot of hemp and chia seeds these days. And you can make your homestyle oatmeal in a pot. There’s nothing like a warm bowl of oatmeal on a cool morning.

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Sunset in Prince Edward Island National Park

There are so many benefits to getting kids out into natural spaces – they benefit from exploring, finding creatures, get to know the provinces they’re learning about in school and they learn to love and protect the environment.

You can make some amazing meals over the fire or you can use some cooking short cuts and head out to enjoy the world around you.

 

Pizza with garlic scape pesto, vegan bacon and asparagus

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We’re in a heat wave here in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) – it has been a long one with daytime temperatures around 30 degrees but with the humidity factored in, it feels like 40. But I had a handful of garlic scapes from the farm and they have a very short season. So I cranked up my oven and made pizza. This is my second batch of scape pesto this week – it is my favourite way to eat these vegetables.

Scapes are the flower growing out of hard necked varieties of garlic – we cut them back to get bigger garlic bulbs. They’re long and curly and have a mild garlic flavour that is delicious in pesto, grilled, in stir fries or anywhere you’d put asparagus or green beans.

The kids won’t touch them – they think they have a strong flavour – and they do have a unique flavour. They pick them out every time – even if I disguise them with green beans! So this pesto is just for the grown-ups. The kids have their own pizza with tomato sauce on it and Daiya cheese. It’s easy enough to split the dough in half and make them the kind of pizza they like.

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For this recipe, feel free to adjust to your taste. Once you have the general concept, you can’t go wrong playing with the ingredients.

Scape pesto

  • a few scapes (6 or so)
  • 1/4 cup of pine nuts
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • fresh basil (to taste – I like 1/2 cup if I can harvest it)
  • 1 tsp salt

Put all the ingredients in a food processor and blend until finely chopped. Spread on pizza or mix with hot, freshly cooked pasta (try gnocchi).

I’ve paired my pesto with a cashew cheese, vegan bacon and asparagus. My daughter ended up loving this pizza with the pesto and cashew cheese!

Vegan grill: tons of veggies and burgers

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Asparagus season is my favourite time of the year. After a long winter of eating potatoes, carrots and other veggies that store well over the winter, the first really fresh vegetable that I can harvest from my garden is asparagus. By Spring, I am craving greens – the ones in the grocery store are tired and tasteless. And then these little sprouts break through the ground.

This winter was a long one. Which made the beginning of asparagus season extra sweet.

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And we love asparagus just about any way you can cook it. But my favourite way to eat asparagus is on the grill. And that brings up the question – grill?

What do vegans grill?

We put just about any vegetable on the grill either in packets or brushed with oil directly on the grill. The ones we brush with oil are: asparagus, peppers, zucchini, onions, scapes and mushrooms. The ones I brush with oil and seasoning are: potatoes, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, broccoli, snow peas and carrots. And then there’s the veggie burgers, tofu, vegan sausages and vegan hot dogs. We’ve done corn on the cob on the grill too!

Since my eldest was old enough to eat solid foods she has been a big fan of barbecued vegetables. Sometimes we’ll toss the grilled vegetables in olive oil and mix them into cooked whole wheat pasta. Veggies that won’t usually get touched will get gobbled down if they’ve been grilled.

The burger above is one my son made himself – burger with vegan cheese, zucchini, pepper and asparagus. Topped with ketchup and it’s a delicious mess – everything falls off and the bun can’t contain its contents. And that’s my picky eater! Mine is topped with mushrooms, grilled onions and whatever else the kids have left me.

More ideas for asparagus

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If you have more asparagus than you know what to do with (this has never happened to me but I guess it’s possible), fry it in olive oil with garlic, add marinated tofu, fresh herbs and pasta. I like to top my pasta with a salty mix of nutritional yeast, hemp seeds, a splash of olive oil to make it all stick together and salt.

Easy tofu marinade:

  • 1 crushed clove of garlic
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar (or other nice vinegar, lemon juice, lime juice)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil

Add cubed tofu to the marinade. Toss and let it sit for about 15 minutes in the marinade before frying it with veggies or you can bake it at 350 for 20 minutes stirring once.

Asparagus for breakfast

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If you still have leftover asparagus, toss it in your scrambled tofu.

The only thing you have to keep in mind with asparagus is not to overcook it. And don’t boil it.

Enjoy it while it lasts!

Veg-enriched tomato sauce with pasta

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It’s Spring in Canada and I’ve started picking from my garden. Mostly I’m getting asparagus but I’ve also got fresh herbs. I’ll do a post about asparagus soon but tonight I managed to sneak a new vegetable into my picky eater – and that’s always worth sharing!

Tomato sauce isn’t always a hit with my son. He doesn’t like it chunky or with too many herbs. He doesn’t like to see the onions but if they’re chopped small and we’re at a restaurant, he may just ignore them. That’s a huge step for him but he might be doing it just to get more white bread or gelato after his dinner. I still consider it a win.

At home, I usually chop the vegetables that he doesn’t like in big pieces so it’s easy for him to find them and pick them out. There have been times when an onion accidentally made it into his mouth and he wouldn’t eat any more dinner as a result. So I know with my family it is not a good idea to hide vegetables.

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Until tonight. I was making a tomato sauce and we had some nice mushrooms, peppers and the canned tomatoes were diced. I knew I’d have to puree them to make a sauce my son would eat so I decided to puree the whole lot together.

I will often puree red peppers in the tomato sauce – it makes for a really great, sweet sauce that the kids love. If you have picky kids, give it a try. Sweet peppers are a great source of Vitamin C and other nutrients and they make an excellent addition to a tomato sauce.

For this sauce, I fried up garlic in olive oil, added chopped red pepper and mushrooms. After a few minutes, I added the can of chopped tomatoes and pureed the mix. Then I let it simmer. I added a few sprigs of fresh rosemary from the garden for flavour.

I had a few asparagus from the garden so I chopped them small and added them to the sauce as it simmered. I didn’t want to puree them since we love asparagus. And that’s it. It made for a delicious sauce and I managed to get my son to eat mushrooms happily for the first time!

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The sauce is served on whole wheat pasta with chopped basil (from the garden) and a mix of hemp seeds, nutritional yeast and salt for a savoury topping. And as you can see, it was served with store-bought bread because I can’t always bake my own bread.

The protein question

I’ve recently been asked about protein. How do I get my protein if I don’t eat animals? Well, it’s not really something I worry about since I eat a good variety of whole foods. Protein is made up of amino acids. Whole proteins are made of all the amino acids our body’s can’t make themselves – essential amino acids. These are found in animal meat. But our bodies have to break them down to use them anyway so there is no advantage to getting our essential amino acids all together.

Vegetables are also full of amino acids but they don’t have them in same combination that we need. But as long as you’re eating a variety – and in this meal we have mushrooms, peppers, whole wheat, hemp seeds and other plant-based sources of amino acids – we’re getting everything we need.

And as I said above, since our bodies need to break them down anyway, there’s really no difference between getting them all in one place or getting them in a variety of places. If you’re getting your protein from a variety of vegetable sources, you’re also getting all the vitamins and minerals your body needs too.

So there you go – as long as you’re indulging in a variety of plant-based foods, you’ll get the protein you need.

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We finished this meal with homemade ice cream made from coconut milk and cashew cream. And that was another great source of protein. The vegan chocolate chips and marshmallows – those were just treats. The bananas just happen to be healthy treats.

Oatmeal cakes with berries

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It’s Victoria Day here in Canada so I thought I’d make something special for breakfast. My kids would be disappointed if I made anything but pancakes but I wanted something different. These pancakes are made with oats.

They are as hearty as you’d expect from a bowl of oatmeal and more nutritious than your average pancake. Topped with berries, they were delicious and the kids were so happy to see I had made pancakes for breakfast!

 

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The recipe comes from Thug Kitchen. It’s quite simple: let the oats soak up almond milk for a few minutes before adding the rest of the dry ingredients and fry them up like pancakes. Next time, I’ll make a double batch – they disappeared too quickly with a family of four.

The berry sauce is simply simmered berries in a bit of sugar, fresh lemon juice, splash of water and vanilla extract. Thug Kitchen calls for blueberries but I had this frozen berry mix with cherries, blackberries and blueberries that the kids love. They’re full of antioxidants and flavour.

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For those of you who are here in Canada, have a great long weekend! We’ll be heading out for a nice, long bike ride as a family with peanut butter and jam sandwiches for lunch along the way. I hope you’re making memories too!